Monday, September 18, 2017

Next Stop: India!


From the food, to the music, fashion and wellness, I've admired Indian culture for a long time. This week, I get to experience one of my top bucket list items by visiting Gujarat, on the Western coast of India. I'll be hosted by Gujarat Tourism and they have compiled an exciting itinerary, including witnessing  and participating in the annual Navaratri Festival, shown above. The nine day Hindu celebration is one of the most popular dance festivals in India, which celebrates the nine forms of goddess. Gujarat is also Gandhi's hometown so I'll be visiting his ashram and exploring ancient stepwells, temples and small towns. I know it will be a life-changing journey so please look out for posts and pix!

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Salsa in Cali, Colombia



Although salsa music was not created in Cali, (they give full credit to Cuba) Calenos have embraced the music and dance with so much passion that the city is known as the "world capital of salsa." I quickly discovered why on my first night in Cali. Dozens of salsa clubs, some little hole in the walls, some full-fledged nightclubs like the legendary Tin Tin Deo, start throbbing with salsa music at about 10pm. Live musicians blast out the swirling rhythms and dancers crowd the floor. I was out of breathe just watching all the twirling, swaying and fast footwork. Colombian style salsa is much faster than conventional salsa and Calenos are noted for their dizzying lifts and fancy footwork. It's said that men in Cali can't get a date without knowing how to salsa so it is clearly an important skill. There are dance schools all over Cali to help out the less gifted dancers and I joined in a fast-paced class at  the Live Salsa & Tango dance school, which had me drenched in sweat and fun. I'm not even close to the finesse of local dancers but joining in at a club is an essential part of the Cali experience.

Check out this video of salsa dancers on a Monday night at El Habanero Club (note the Cuba flags)





Cali also hosts a live cabaret salsa show called Ensalsate, this video features musicians from the Petronio Alvarez Fest:



Sunday, September 10, 2017

How to Help The Caribbean After Hurricane Irma



Barbuda

The reports of Hurricane Irma's destruction across the Caribbean region  has left me worried and with my stomach in knots. After watching how Hurricane Harvey pounded Texas, and how Irma continues to menace Florida, it's doubly concerning because the Caribbean doesn't get the visibility or response that the U.S. commands. The islands of the Caribbean are more than just vacation spots, they shelter a people and a culture that I know and love. After hearing from friends and researching reports, it's clear that donations are needed more than anything else to start a rebuilding process that will probably take years. The most extreme devastation happened on Barbuda, the tiny sister island to Antigua whose proud citizens and pink sand stole my heart years ago. The island has been almost completely wiped out, leaving Barbudans homeless and evacuated to Antigua. St. Thomas, Anguilla, St. Martin and parts of Cuba are also challenged with trying to recover from Irma's destruction. 

St. Thomas
The Caribbean needs immediate help to assist her people and start the process of rebuilding. I have compiled a list of reputable organizations that will supply direct aid to the people who need it. In the wake of many relief agencies being accused of fraud, I researched these at Charity Navigator and Charity Watch to measure their effectiveness. 

Here's a list of organizations that accept donations for Hurricane Relief in the Caribbean:

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Global Giving Hurricane Irma Relief Fund: This org.receives high ratings from Charity Navigator.

Community Foundation of Virgin Islands: A local charity that supplies funds directly to the U.S Virgin Islands.
U.S. Virgin Island Relief Fund: Retired NBA star and St. Croix native Tim Duncan has donated $250,000 to this charity and will match donations to the first million.

Anguilla
Unicef: This org. has very good transparency and honesty rating. It's also one of my personal charities that I support annually. Unicef has a disaster relief fund  that supports children affected by Hurricane Irma.

American University of Antigua Barbuda Relief Fund:  The University of Antigua, on Barbuda's sister island, has created a fund for emergency supplies and long-term support for hurricane survivors.

Caribbean Tourism Organization Hurricane Relief Fund:  This organization represents 27 islands and their tourism sectors. The fund supplies donations directly to the ministry of tourism of affected member islands to help with rebuilding efforts.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

The Cats of Cali, Colombia


When you visit the charismatic city of Cali, Colombia, you will immediately notice a few things. First, there is music and dancing everywhere but mostly at night and mostly salsa. Secondly, there are cats scattered all around the Cali River. Although music and dancing and cats might not seem to have anything to do with each other, in Cali, they are interrelated.


In 1996, the famous Colombian painter Hernando Tejada,, donated a three ton bronze cat sculpture to the city he called home. Called El Gato Del Rio, or the River Cat, he sits grinning on the banks of the river. In 2006, Calenos decided that the cat needed a few novias or girlfriends. So artists created 15 different cats that complete Parque El Gato de Tejada. If you stroll along the riverwalk, you'll see an array of pretty kitty sculptures, much smaller than the original gato. There's La Gata Dulce, pictured in the first photo. She's covered in sugarcane branches and leaves to reference Cali's sugarcane history and her sweetness makes her my fave. Above is Gata Constelada, displaying different astronomical constellations.


This is Gata Dormida and I think she's worn out from chasing all of those birds lounging on her back.


Here's Gata Decorativa, whose name and style was probably the least creative that I saw. So how are Cali, cats and dancing all connected? Well, Cali is the world capital of salsa and the city really jumps  with music and dancing at night. That nocturnal nature, famously shared by cats, is how Cali came to have cats as landmarks.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Next Stop: Colombia


This week, I'll be exploring the vibrant culture of Colombia, specifically the Pacific city of Cali, otherwise known as the Salsa Capital of the World. Hosted by Tia Stephanie Tours, I'll be learning about Afro Colombian history and traditions, highlighted by the Petronio Alvarez Music Festival, which celebrates the region's music and dance. My adventures will also include salsa lessons, a cooking class, museum visits and hopefully, a climb up to Cristo Rey,  the towering Christ statue shown above. It's not as big as Rio's but it's the largest in Colombia and is a landmark for Cali, the country's third largest city.  I'm looking forward to picking up some (much needed) salsa moves and discovering the intricacies of this rich culture so stay tuned!

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Curacao's Artful Architecture


The Caribbean region is known for happy, pastel-colored buildings that blend with the tropical landscape but no other island displays quite the architectural flavor of Curacao.  Nothing makes me happier than vivid, rich color so I was in a constant state of joy on the candy-colored streets of Willemstad, the island's capital. This Unesco World Heritage City combines Dutch colonial architecture with pure Caribbean style. A crayon box of colors cover the buildings so that walking the streets is like strolling through an art gallery. The flower accented building above is  a highlight of the Scharloo district, a historic neighborhood that's been transformed with street art.



The deep green house above is a landmark in Scharloo. It's called the Wedding Cake House because it was given as a wedding gift from a father to his newlywed daughter. It's the most photographed building in Curacao.



Downtown Willemstad enchants with 17th century architecture and bright hues everywhere you look. Curacao is famous for the kaleidoscope of colors, including citrus yellow, watermelon red, and cornflower blue that mark the island's iconic skyline.


The story goes that the buildings of Willemstad were once all stark white. A 19th century governor complained that gazing at all the glaring white facades highlighted against the intense sun, gave him migraine headaches. He ordered all residents to paint their houses any color but white. After his death, it was discovered that he owned stock in the only local paint company!  There's now a law that prohibits government officials from mingling business interests but there's also a law requiring owners of the historic structures to paint their building a bright hue and to repaint it every two years. 


I can't say that I'm mad at the governor or the reason that Curacao is so famously colorful. It's such an exciting, uplifting experience being surrounded by so much color that I think that more government officials should make laws requiring beauty and color.

Monday, July 31, 2017

The Rosy Beauty of Curacao Flamingos



One of my favorite things about the Dutch Caribbean island of Curacao is the color that drenches the architecture, landscape and culture. I was swept up by the joy of being completely encompassed by color but I was still taken aback to spot these flamingos. Splashing around in the shallow water of the Jan Thiel salt flats, this flamboyance of flamingos commanded attention with their bright pink feathers. They were just far way enough to be unbothered by tourists staring at them but close enough to cast a rosy spell.