Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Iranian Radiance



Last week, Iran appointed the first woman cabinet member since the start of the Islamic Republic 30 years ago. Marzieh Vahid Dastjerdi was approved as health minister, supplying a huge dose of hope for women's rights in Iran. Coincidentally, I recently discovered this antique Persian necklace at my local antique shop. Persia was what Iran was called before 1936. Jewelry played a huge part of the ancient culture and still does. This silver necklace displays turquoise and carnelian beads most likely used to ward off evil. Although this necklace is about 100-years-old, ethnic pieces like these fill 2009 trend reports. Now whenever I wear it, I think of the women of Iran and their fight for equality.

16 comments:

Tiffany,Ebony Intuition said...

Congrats to her, and lovely necklace.

marina villatoro said...

Wow, I didn't know that women ever had rights in Iran.

What an amazing piece of jewelry! I'm such a bad shopper, I'd probably walk right past this and not see it:)

Fly Girl said...

Tifanny, thanks, it's my current fave.

Marina, the Iran president has vowed to put more women in government. He tried to appoint three but the other 2 weren''t approved.

Dominique said...

Beautiful piece of jewelry!
I always liked the turquoise and carnelian combination--something I remember seeing at a lot of museum shows featuring ancient Egyptian jewelry.
Here's hoping that the appointment of Iran's new cabinet member truly signals new hope for women there.

Heather on her travels said...

I love picking up ethnic jewellery on my travels - it's the perfect souvenir. Light to bring back and a nice gift - also, as you say, it reminds you of the story behind it every time you wear it. Here's to the rise of women's contribution in public life throughout the Middle East.

Fly Girl said...

Dominique, thanks, carnelian and turquoise is one of my favorite combos too. I seem to be drawn to it a lot. I think the appointment does signal some progress for women.

Heather, I wish I could say I bring back jewelry for gifts. I tend to hoard it all for myself! My mom is the only one who sometimes gets some jewelry from my travels and she has so much I'm afriad she forgets where it's all from.

Eileen said...

Good for Iran for recognizing her strengths, and thanks for pointing this out! Iran has a fascinating history, lots of which I learned about in the book Daughter of Persia which chronicles the start of social work in Iran, by its author, an incredible woman. I hope they can keep up the fight, because right now it seems like a tough one.

Also, beautiful necklace. I'm sure you can pull it off. Even with my big personality, I kind of tend towards smaller jewelry. Maybe that will change. Inspiration abounds.

Jean-Luc Picard said...

A wonderful necklace. I'm surprised a woman is a minister in Iran

Fly Girl said...

Eileen, thanks for that book tip, I'll add it to my towering list.I can see you wearing the neclace. Do you think Chile and it's conservative style has made you attracted to tiny jewelery?

Jean-Luc, the world is surprised but I hope it's a sign of things to come.

A Cuban In London said...

Good for Iran. After the recent turmoil, a ray of light shining through.

Your necklace is so beautiful. Many thanks.

Greetings from London.

Fly Girl said...

Cubano, I agree. Although a recent Guardian column suggests otherwise, I have hope that this is a good first step.

Catherine said...

I love this type of ethnic jewwellery and let's hope it heralds the beginning of a new era for women in era...albeit a very tiny step..

Fly Girl said...

Catherine, I thought you might like this necklace. It's similar to some Aztec styles I've seen in Mexico. And a tiny step is better than none at all..

jessiev said...

what a timely post - and serendipitous that you found this incredible necklace. have you been wearing it a lot? it is gorgeous!

Fly Girl said...

Jessie, thanks. I do wear it a lot. Sometimes a get a little leery of wearing it so much because it's so old and may break but I wear it a few times a month.

Fashionable Earth said...

We also support human and women’s rights in
Iran. Fashion, environmental responsibility and social justice can all be combined to change the world, please read our post for more info: http://fashionableearth.org/blog/2009/10/13/cause-of-the-season-iran/